6 Hormones Responsible For Weight Gain In Women!!!

It has been found in a survey that women vulnerable to slow metabolism, food cravings and hormonal changes throughout their life. All this may be related to PMS, pregnancy, menopause or daily stress. Research reveals that female hormones, metabolism, appetite and weight loss are linked together. It is possible to manage your weight well with personalized diet plans and a physically active lifestyle through a proper study of hormone mechanisms in women.

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Women are usually more affected by hormonal changes than men. Hormones seem to affect women of all age groups and it has an impact on their menstrual cycle and daily life. But, how do hormones affect weight gain?

The hormones that are responsible for weight gain are as follows:

1. Thyroid Hormone:

Thyroid function affects the rate at which we burn our calories. Hypothyroidism is responsible for weight gain in women. If you have the symptoms associated with low thyroid function like weight gain, low body temperature, hair loss, fatigue, dull mood or dry skin do ask your doctor about getting a thyroid test done. Weight gain is the result of decreased metabolic rate of the body.

2. Estrogen:

Estrogen affects our metabolism. It is the female sex hormone. During menopause, the estrogen level drops, causing weight gain, especially around the gut. Fat cells are found to be another source of estrogen that converts calories into fats. This can also lead to obesity.

3. Progesterone:

During menopause, there is a decrease in the level of progesterone in the body. It has a role to play in metabolism in many ways. Actually, decreased levels of this hormone do not cause weight gain. It leads to water retention and bloating in women that makes them feel fuller and heavier.

4. Testosterone:

Women who suffer from PCOS – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome have an increased level of testosterone (male hormone) that leads to a number of problems like: weight gain, menstrual disorders, facial hair, acne and infertility. Testosterone is responsible for muscle mass in women. Due to decrease in the level of testosterone during menopause, there is decrease in the metabolic rate, which consequently results in weight gain.

5. Insulin:

Insulin is the hormone in the body that stores fat. It is produced by the pancreas. Its job is to take the nutrients from the blood stream and store them in the body cells. The real problem starts when too much sugar or starches are consumed. Insulin is also a causal agent for PCOS that leads to infertility. High insulin level in the blood contributes to weight gain.

6. Stress Hormone Or Cortisol:

Cortisol is a hormone that is released when a person is stressed out or has a lack of sleep. Elevated cortisol leads to weight gain and that to abdominal weight gain in particular. High levels of cortisol trigger food cravings. And you will end up munching on junk food. No wonder it leads to weight gain. Cushing’s syndrome is an extreme condition that drives cortisol production.

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Here are some tips to avoid weight gain for women:

We all know that loosing weight is not an easy task to do. However, implementing these lifestyle changes and food habits might help you reach your weight goals sooner than you thought!

Eating food wisely and staying away from junk food
Keeping a record and measuring the progress
Avoiding alcohol and aerated drinks
Not substituting sugar for artificial sweeteners
Exercising regularly
Following a low-carb diet plan
Eating only when hungry and at regular intervals
Reviewing the medications
Sleeping more or at least for 8 hours
Getting into optimal ketosis with low insulin levels
Getting the hormones checked
Stressing less and indulging in meditation
Consuming less of bakery and dairy products
Drinking sufficient water
Eating foods or supplements rich in minerals and vitamins

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